I need a Water Bottle!

The raving rambles of a hyper nerdy college student!


Ask me anything  
Reblogged from freak-for-disney
Reblogged from nanodash
nanodash:

This is a sound wave, as represented by fire. Making it the most metal oscilloscope in history.
To be exact, it’s called a Ruben’s Tube. And it’s playing the start of the chorus to Journey’s Any Way You Want It. It must be closing time in the clubs, that’s the only reason they play Journey.
Sound is just air vibrations, as the air vibrates it creates sections of high density air and low density air. The more air, the higher the flame can be. So it translates the sound wave for us. Also fire is pretty.
See how it briefly lapses into a sine wave? That happens when Steve Perry’s dulcet tones occasionally hit one of the harmonics of the pipe, making a standing wave. Which is cool.
This loses something without the sound, so please, go listen to the video here

nanodash:

This is a sound wave, as represented by fire. Making it the most metal oscilloscope in history.

To be exact, it’s called a Ruben’s Tube. And it’s playing the start of the chorus to Journey’s Any Way You Want It. It must be closing time in the clubs, that’s the only reason they play Journey.

Sound is just air vibrations, as the air vibrates it creates sections of high density air and low density air. The more air, the higher the flame can be. So it translates the sound wave for us. Also fire is pretty.

See how it briefly lapses into a sine wave? That happens when Steve Perry’s dulcet tones occasionally hit one of the harmonics of the pipe, making a standing wave. Which is cool.

This loses something without the sound, so please, go listen to the video here

(via coolsciencegifs)

Reblogged from star-trekker
star-trekker:

How Vaccine Fears Fueled The Resurgence Of Preventable Diseases

For most of us, measles and whooping cough are diseases of the past. You get a few shots as a kid and then hardly think about them again.
But that’s not the case in all parts of the world — not even parts of the U.S.
As an interactive map from the Council on Foreign Relations illustrates, several diseases that are easily prevented with vaccines have made a comeback in the past few years. Their resurgence coincides with changes in perceptions about vaccine safety.
Since 2008 folks at the think tank CFR have been plotting all the cases of measles, mumps, rubella, polio and whooping cough around the world. Each circle on the map represents a local outbreak of a particular disease, while the size of the circle indicates the number of people infected in the outbreak.
As you flip through the various maps over the years, two trends clearly emerge: Measles has surged back in Europe, while whooping cough has become a problem here in the U.S.
Childhood immunization rates plummeted in parts of Europe and the U.K. after a 1998 study falsely claimed that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella was linked to autism.
That study has since been found to be fraudulent. But fears about vaccine safety have stuck around in Europe and here in the U.S.
Viruses and bacteria have taken full advantage of the immunization gaps.
In 2011, France reported a massive measles outbreak with nearly 15,000 cases. Only the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Indonesia, Nigeria and Somalia suffered larger measles outbreaks that year.
In 2012, the U.K. reported more than 2,000 measles cases, the largest number since 1994.
Here in the U.S., the prevalence of whooping cough shot up in 2012 to nearly 50,000 cases. Last year cases declined to about 24,000 — which is still more than tenfold the number reported back in the early ’80s when the bacteria infected less than 2,000 people.
So what about countries in Africa? Why are there so many big, colorful circles dotting the continent? For many parents there, the problem is getting access to vaccines, not fears of it.

(source)

star-trekker:

How Vaccine Fears Fueled The Resurgence Of Preventable Diseases

For most of us, measles and whooping cough are diseases of the past. You get a few shots as a kid and then hardly think about them again.

But that’s not the case in all parts of the world — not even parts of the U.S.

As an interactive map from the Council on Foreign Relations illustrates, several diseases that are easily prevented with vaccines have made a comeback in the past few years. Their resurgence coincides with changes in perceptions about vaccine safety.

Since 2008 folks at the think tank CFR have been plotting all the cases of measles, mumps, rubella, polio and whooping cough around the world. Each circle on the map represents a local outbreak of a particular disease, while the size of the circle indicates the number of people infected in the outbreak.

As you flip through the various maps over the years, two trends clearly emerge: Measles has surged back in Europe, while whooping cough has become a problem here in the U.S.

Childhood immunization rates plummeted in parts of Europe and the U.K. after a 1998 study falsely claimed that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella was linked to autism.

That study has since been found to be fraudulent. But fears about vaccine safety have stuck around in Europe and here in the U.S.

Viruses and bacteria have taken full advantage of the immunization gaps.

In 2011, France reported a massive measles outbreak with nearly 15,000 cases. Only the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Indonesia, Nigeria and Somalia suffered larger measles outbreaks that year.

In 2012, the U.K. reported more than 2,000 measles cases, the largest number since 1994.

Here in the U.S., the prevalence of whooping cough shot up in 2012 to nearly 50,000 cases. Last year cases declined to about 24,000 — which is still more than tenfold the number reported back in the early ’80s when the bacteria infected less than 2,000 people.

So what about countries in Africa? Why are there so many big, colorful circles dotting the continent? For many parents there, the problem is getting access to vaccines, not fears of it.

(source)

(via coolsciencegifs)

Reblogged from infinity-imagined

infinity-imagined:

MRI scans of a Human brain.

(via coolsciencegifs)

Reblogged from headlikeanorange
coolsciencegifs:

headlikeanorange:
The Guillemot is a seabird that lays its eggs on a bare rock ledge on a cliff face. When an egg is accidentally dislodged, its shape causes it to spin in a tight circle, which prevents it from falling off the ledge into the sea. (Springwatch - BBC)

coolsciencegifs:

headlikeanorange:

The Guillemot is a seabird that lays its eggs on a bare rock ledge on a cliff face. When an egg is accidentally dislodged, its shape causes it to spin in a tight circle, which prevents it from falling off the ledge into the sea. (Springwatch - BBC)

Reblogged from coolsciencegifs

coolsciencegifs:

More Leidenfrost Effect: Dipping your hand in Molten Lead

DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME

One of the GIFs above is of a super-heated steel ball being lowered into cool water. The sheer heat of the red-hot steel ball causes the water that it touches to immediately turn to water vapour, even under the surface of the water. This little atmosphere of steam that forms around the red-hot ball actually insulates it. As steam (water vapour)  is a gas, it conducts heat less effectively than a liquid or a solid. This means that the steel ball will not decrease in  temperature by a significant amount for some time, insulated by water vapour.

The hand being dipped in to the molten lead above has previously been dipped in cold water. When the hand is quickly dipped into the lead, the Leidenfrost Effect begins. The molten lead never gets in contact with the fingers, despite the hand being immersed in it (and you can see his hand coming out of the lead clean). The cold water on the hand begins to boil and turn into water vapour, insulating the hand from horrible burns. You can see the extent of the insulation on the heat-sensing camera on the bottom GIF: the fingers remain blue and cool surrounded by the hot molten lead. The trick is in the speed though… the thin layer of water vapour will only insulate the hand for so long before a disaster ensues… 

Another CoolScienceGifs post on the Leidenfrost Effect HERE

source

Yes- these Gifs are courtesy of the Myth Busters! :)
Reblogged from coolsciencegifs

coolsciencegifs:

The wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) has gained much attention over the past century due to its miraculous ability to freeze and then defrost again just as if nothing ever happened. It’s the frog version of science fiction and cryogenics.

Similar to other northern frogs that hibernate close to the surface in soil and/or leaf litter, wood frogs can tolerate the freezing of their blood and other tissues. Urea is accumulated in tissues in preparation for overwintering, and liver glycogen is converted in large quantities to glucose in response to internal ice formation. Both urea and glucose act as “anti-freeze” to limit the amount of ice that forms and to reduce osmotic shrinkage of cells. Frogs can survive many freeze/thaw events during winter if no more than about 65% of the total body water freezes.

source

source

Reblogged from 4gifs
kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

kokiron:

bigeisamazing:

Crows are one of the smartest animals out here.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via coolsciencegifs)

Reblogged from benigoat
benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

(Source: reddit.com, via coolsciencegifs)

Reblogged from woodywombpecker
transkomaeda:

avrilgif:



can we Not bring this back

transkomaeda:

avrilgif:

can we Not bring this back

(Source: woodywombpecker, via coolsciencegifs)

Reblogged from oomshi
sliperior:

donnysoldier:

andangelstofly:

oomshi:

(x)

But the titanic sank?



if only the titanic did that

sliperior:

donnysoldier:

andangelstofly:

oomshi:

(x)

But the titanic sank?

image

if only the titanic did that

(via gravyboatlighthouse)

Reblogged from biologialovers

Reblogged from hallucynation
hallucynation:

It’s the kids from The Magic School Bus all grown up!
I have been coming back to this picture over and over and over because it makes me really really happy. MSB is my forever obsession. And they’re even placed according to their pairings. Go show the artist love [x]
L to R: Ralphie, Keesha, Carlos, Dorothy Ann, Phoebe, Tim, Wanda, Arnold, Janet

hallucynation:

It’s the kids from The Magic School Bus all grown up!

I have been coming back to this picture over and over and over because it makes me really really happy. MSB is my forever obsession. And they’re even placed according to their pairings. Go show the artist love [x]

L to R: Ralphie, Keesha, Carlos, Dorothy Ann, Phoebe, Tim, Wanda, Arnold, Janet

Reblogged from catharsus
catharsus:

I can’t deal. I still know all the names

catharsus:

I can’t deal. I still know all the names

Reblogged from bakeroni

How I want to be as a kindergarten teacher:

bakeroni:

How I’m honestly afraid I’ll be as a teacher: